Scar Tissue

Please select from the menu above

Return to Glossary
Go to Programs & Protocols
Special Insights Archive
Go to Home Page

Scar tissue: is tissue that appears abnormal (if external); sometimes called adhesions (if internal).

Overview

Scar tissue is non-functional, structural tissue composed of waste proteins the body makes to hold things together.

Formation of scar tissue increases when the body suffers trauma or surgery and can be minimized and even avoided if blood serum levels of vitamin C are kept elevated and waste proteins are not allowed to stagnate and are dissolved and kept away from the surgery or trauma site.

Preparation before surgery and quick action after trauma/surgery using Young Again Protocols helps tissue heal normally.

Scar tissue is common in people as they age because of neglect or abuse of the body terrain; meaning, their body has become acidic and filled with excess waste in the tissues.

Amyloid plaque is first cousin to scar tissue. Both scar tissue and amyloid can be naturally broken down and dissolved causing the body to automatically build healthy, new  tissues, such as: ligaments, bone, cartilage, skin and muscle.

Scar tissue is every surgeon’s nightmare because it slows blood flow and blocks the body’s ability to heal following surgery. Generally, the slower healing occurs, the more scar tissue formation occurs.

Scar tissue is the end product of soluble tissue wastes that have stagnated in the joints, organs and tissues of the body and have morphed into structural waste. Amyiloid plaque is similar to scar tissue in that is does not belong in the body.

Waste in the intercellular spaces between the cells is called amyloid fluid. If tissue fluids are absorbed by the lymphatic system, they are called lymphatic fluid.

Solutions

Change your lifestyle and ask for help.

The Tissue & Liver Protocol is the single most powerful way to rid your body of excess waste, restore liver efficiency and dissolve scar tissue and amyloid plaque. Click hyperlink to read more about it.

 

Return to Glossary
Go to Programs & Protocols
Special Insights Archive
Go to Home Page