Resistance (antibiotic, bacterial)

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Anecdotal observations by John Thomas

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Resistance (antibiotic): the phenomenon where bacteria develop resistance to various antibiotic drugs and run away infection.

Overview

Bacterial drug resistance is the product of biological morphing of bacteria in the presence of fungal mycotoxins made by yeast and molds.

Mycotoxins are the chemical control mechanisms used by fungi to neutralize immune function and create secondary infection by bacteria and viruses [which are ALWAYS secondary infections, NEVER, primary infections.

Meaning, first comes fungal yeast infestation and takeover of the body’s terrain and DNA merger of human and fungal DNA, then comes bacteria and viruses, secondarily.

Bacterial resistance ends when mycotoxin dominance, ends; and, the more antibiotics used, the worse bacterial resistance becomes, but the phenomenon is fungus driven, not bacterial, driven.  See The Germ Theory of Disease.

See Special Insights, Medical Crisis, Survival & Recovery in the Archive link, below.

Suggestions

  1. Change your lifestyle and your diet.
  2. Embrace Young Again Club Protocols.
  3. Ask for help and be open to new ideas.

 

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