Polyps (colon)

Please select from the menu above


Anecdotal observations by John Thomas

Return to Glossary
Go to Programs & Protocols
Special Insights Archive
Go to Home Page

Polyp(s), colon: fungal growth on the wall of the colon that precede colon cancer.  The problem is NOT the existence of polyps, but what caused them.

About 10,000 people a year DIE from internal bleeding caused by “clipping” of colon polyps.  The procedure is medieval, and no knowledgable patient would eve agree to their regular, and ongoing, colonoscopy if they know the truth about the procedure and how easy it is to remedy the problem of, polyps.

And, sooner or later, everyone grows polyps.  The reason: systemic takeover of the body by fungal yeast. See Mold & Fungus Protocol also, colonoscopy.

Overview of Colon

Colon: the lower six feet of the intestine; also known as the large intestine or bowel.

The colon begins at the cecum (the fist-sized pouch at the junction of the small and large intestine; the appendix dangles from the cecum) and ends at the anus.

The bowel is the most toxic area of the body and the area of the body most subject to cancer.  The expression, “Cancer begins in the colon!” says it best.

The bowel is easily maintained and kept healthy by following the Low or High Enema Protocol. The bowel is the target zone for colonoscopy. Polyps form in the wall of the colon, but removal of polyps is a dangerous procedure. More people die each year from internal bleeding and complications associated with polyp ‘removal’ than die of colon cancer; 90% of polyps removed are benign.

Colon cancer is a TERRAIN and lifestyle issue that has absolutely nothing to do with your genes or DNA.  It is a self imposed condition of neglect and abuse.

A better solution than subjecting yourself to colonoscopy and polyp ‘clipping’ is to practice Low or High Enema Protocol so you will not grow polyps or develop colon cancer.

The bowels should move at least three times a day, every day; anything les is modified constipation, opinions to the contrary not withstanding.  Constipation is a gut, water, sweets, diet and digestion issue and can only be remedied by lifestyle changes.

The colon is the location for manifestation of diverticulitis and colitis.  In men, the colon is located next to the prostate and is a serious source of prostate infection. However, men’s #1 issue with prostate is inflammation, poor circulation and autoimmune attacks stemming from the intestinal tract both large and small intestine.

Male prostate issues always involve the colon; prostate problems are the male equivalent of bladder infections in females which are seldom ‘infections’ and almost always driven by inflammation in the gut. Prostate infections have a bowel/gut aspect, and in women they are closely linked to hormonal imbalances of the regulatory hormones: leptin, insulin, adrenaline and glucagon. To learn more, read Special Insights, Change Your Food Habits, Change Your Life here.

In women, the colon is closely linked to menstrual difficulties and menopausal issues. Poor digestion of food drives and dietary sweets and carbohydrates fuel production of putrid gas and bloating. Yeast issues and bladder infections have a bowel/gut aspect, and in women they are closely linked to hormonal imbalances of the regulatory hormones: leptin, insulin, adrenaline and glucagon. To learn more, read Special Insights, Change Your Food Habits, Change Your Life here.

The existence of hemorrhoids confirms of bowel, diet, and digestion issues aggravated by incorrect positioning during defecation.

Bowel disorders are CLASSIC manifestations of a sick, compromised liver and poor bile production. Bowel issues have great impact on sleep disorders and inability to exerience deep sleep.

The Autoimmune Attack Cycle™ and Sugar/Alcohol Cycle are active in all bowel disorders.  Terrain management is a core principle of YAC and the book, Young Again!

 

Suggestions

  1. Change your lifestyle and your diet.
  2. Embrace Young Again Club Protocols.
  3. Ask for help and be open to new ideas.

 

Return to Glossary
Go to Programs & Protocols
Special Insights Archive
Go to Home Page