Insulin

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Anecdotal observations by John Thomas

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Insulin: is a regulatory hormone produced by the pancreas for metabolism of carbohydrates and sugars and maintenance of healthy blood sugar levels.

Overview

Insulin resistance: refers to cellular ‘resistance’ to admission of insulin and its payload of sugars for burning by the mitochondria in the electron transport chain of the Krebs Cycle.

When sugars cannot enter the cells, they remain in circulation in the blood, hence resistance and elevated blood sugar levels and eventually, diabetes.

Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus refers to dependence on use of insulin because the B-cells of the pancreas (islet cells) are dysfunctional and can no longer synthesize the body’s own natural insulin.  This is sometimes called Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

Non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus: refers to adult onset, Type II diabetes mellitus.  Here, the problem is overproduction of insulin because a second pancreatic hormone called glucagon, fails to prevent insulin’s effects by preventing the liver from storing too much sugar resulting in a diabetic crisis of extreme low blood sugar and the need for artificial insulin. People with fatty livers are classic examples of this condition which, in time, leads to full blown diabetes.

Diabetes is a classic autoimmune condition involving stress and inflammation on key vital organs.

Read Special Insights, Pre-Diabetes & Aging in Archive link below.

See Autoimmune Attack Cycle, Sugar/Alcohol Cycle by clicking hyperlink.

Suggestions

  1. Change your lifestyle and your diet.
  2. Embrace Young Again Club Protocols.
  3. Ask for help and be open to new ideas.

See Digestion, Inflammation, Tissue & Liver Protocol and carbohydrates in the Glossary link below.

See Special Insights, Change Your Food Habits, Change Your Life, by clicking hyperlink.

Return to Glossary
Go to Programs & Protocols
Special Insights Archive
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