Endotoxin

Please select from the menu above


Anecdotal observations by John Thomas

Return to Glossary
Go to Programs & Protocols
Special Insights Archive
Go to Home Page

Endotoxin: poisons made by pathogenic bacterial organisms when they die or are disturbed and absorbed or leaked into the blood stream through the intestinal gut wall by normal absorption or through a leaky-gut, compromised, intestinal wall.

Mycotoxin: same, except made by molds, fungus and yeast.

Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), also known as lipoglycans and endotoxins, are found in the outer membrane of certain Gram-negative bacteria and elicit strong immune responses in animals when released into circulation by the bacteria when distrubed or upon death of the bacterium.

Overview

The term endotoxin also refers to toxic byproducts of incomplete digestion, especially of proteins.

Food allergies and intolerances are classic examples of food related endotoxic response and generally involve proteins.  Gluten intolerance and peanut intolerance are examples.

Poor digestion produces endotoxins, gas and bloat; common conditions resulting from putrefaction [rotting] of food in the intestinal tract.

Death of unhealthy bacteria, molds and yeasts produces side-effects sometimes referred to as “cleansing responses,” but this response is also the effect of toxins released from burdened tissues.

See YAC Immune Protocol in the Protocols Link below.

Examples of such side effects are encountered during protocols such as the Tissue & Liver Protocol and the Mold & Fungus Protocol.

See EndoBiotica for more.

Suggestions

  1. Change your lifestyle and your diet.
  2. Embrace Young Again Club Protocols.
  3. Ask for help and be open to new ideas.

 

Return to Glossary
Go to Programs & Protocols
Special Insights Archive
Go to Home Page