CRP (C-reactive protein)

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Anecdotal observations by John Thomas

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C-reactive protein (CRP) is a protein found in blood plasma whose levels rise in response to infammation.  Medically, it is viewed from the perspective of an acute phase protein of hepatic origin that increases following secretion by macrophages and T-cells.

Overview

CRP is synthesized by the liver and is perhaps the very best and earliest warning marker of LOW GRADE INFLAMMATION in the body, and a forerunner of cardiovascular problems.

CRP is rarely if ever used to predict or confirm a disease condition, instead being relegated to the status of medical artifact that appears AFTER acute phase infection; hence it is generally ignored.

The alternative medical arena which tends to shadow official medicine, has an equally poor understanding and interpretation of CRP; hence, it is acknowledged at best and otherwise ignored.

Think of CRP as the only VALID marker of systemic low-grade infection in the body.  It should be viewed from the perspective of “systemic and low-grade.  However, if you suffer, are in pain or have any kind of diagnosed medical condition or dis-ease, know that your body is at war withing itself and against itself.

CPR is the VERY BEST CONFIRMATION of low-grade inflammation in the body.  Inflammation is driven by yeast overgrowth, poor diet and hormonal resistance.

CRP is generally ignored by the medical system until test scores become grossly elevated.  Normal test score range is: 0-.5; however, it is very common to see scores of 1-10 and more. The ONLY acceptable test score for CRP is “zero!”

See A/G Ratio for another useful metric by clicking Glossary link below.

Suggestions

  1. Change your lifestyle and your diet.
  2. Embrace Young Again Club Protocols.
  3. Ask for help and be open to new ideas.

Please read Special Insights, Change Your Food Habits, Change Your Life here.

Also see Special Insight, Yeast: Why Your Should Care and Low-Grade Inflammation by clicking archive link this page.

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Go to Programs & Protocols
Special Insights Archive
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