Campylobactor [bacteria]

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Anecdotal observations by John Thomas

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Campylobacter: an opportunistic, pathogenic bacteria 

Overview

Campylobacter bacteria are able to move via unipolar or bipolar flagella. They generally survive in environments with low oxygen and are capable of morphing into other strains.

Campylobacter are common to poultry and easily transferred by poor sanitary practices. The number one best defense against oral derived bacterial infection is high production of hydochloric acid.  Dietary supplementation is the best way to defend against gastrointestinal infections.

Campylobacter can cause a gastrointestinal infection called campylobacteriosis. The incubation period is 24–72 hours after infection.  This is characterized by inflammatory, sometimes bloody diarrhea or dysentery, mostly including cramps, fever, and pain.

The most common routes of transmission are fecal-oral, ingestion of contaminated food or water, and the eating of raw meat. Foods implicated in campylobacteriosis include raw or under-cooked poultry, raw dairy products, and contaminated produce.

Campylobacter is sensitive to the stomach’s normal production of hydrochloric acid: as a result, the infectious dose is relatively high, and the bacteria rarely cause illness when a person is exposed to less than 10,000 organisms.

Nevertheless, people taking antacid medication (e. g. people with gastritis or stomach ulcers) are at higher risk of contracting disease from a smaller amount of organisms, since this type of medication inhibits normal gastric acid.

A Campylobacter infection can be the underlying cause of Guillain–Barré syndrome.  Generally, infections tend to be self-limiting and settle on their own.

There is a growing number of quinolone-resistant strains. Evidence suggests this is caused by an overuse of this class of antibiotics in animal agriculture.

Suggestions

  1. Change your lifestyle and your diet.
  2. Embrace Young Again Club Protocols.
  3. Ask for help and be open to new ideas.

 

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